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Spice Advice: A Note on Cumin – Brown and Black. From The Archives.

A Note on Cumin

Cumin Seeds

Cumin is a small shrubbery herb, the seeds of which have a pungent scent, and are used as a flavouring and as a condiment. It is said that cumin’s therapeutic properties are as a stomachic, bitter tonic, carminative, stimulant and astringent. Cumin is an ancient favourite of Egyptian origin, extensively used throughout the region, and by people living close to the Mediterranean coastline. Now it is also an essential Indian ingredient and many people associate it with India rather than the Mediterranean now.

Cumin seeds look a little like caraway seeds, but are slightly larger, plumper and lighter in colour. They are used both whole and ground. When whole, in India, they are often dry roasted or flash cooked in oil (tadka) to intensify their flavour and to make them slightly nutty. When ground, they are used in rice and vegetable dishes. Roasted and ground, they are sprinkled over many snack foods, relishes and yoghurt dishes.

Cumin Seeds, Black (Shar Jeera, Kala Jeera)

Black Cumin is a rarer and more expensive form of cumin, with sweeter, smaller and more delicate seeds. There is some confusion about this spice. It is not the same as nigella seed.

The dark brown, 3 mm long seeds are used, and have an earthy, heavy aroma and a nutty taste after cooking. Black cumin originates in Northern India and Central Asia, and is not much known outside Iran, Tajikistan, Pakistan and the western part of Northern India (Kashmir, Punjab).

These are used in Garam Masala where the mild pungency is perfect. The seeds can be dry roasted and sprinkled over rice pilaffs.

From the A Note On Series

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About Ganga108

Heat in the Kitchen, Cooking with Spirit. Temple junkie, temple builder, temple cleaner. Lover of life, people, cultures, travel. Champion of growth, change and awareness. Taker of photos. Passionate about family. Happy.

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